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Women's History Month at STLCC

In celebration of Women’s History Month, St. Louis Community College will host a variety of events on each campus throughout March. The public is welcome to come participate in these events.

Florissant Valley

   Tuesday, March 3
    Telling our Stories/Impacting Our Communities
The Moms of Cold Water Creek and FV SEED Students Speak Out
    A group of mothers from the north county area talk about the dangers of the way the West Lake landfill is functioning and its connection to the Cold Water Creek waste. They share scientific data that support the connection to the toxins from the landfill and Cold Water Creek to the number of cancer and lupus reports.
SEED students will present presentation boards and short explanations of the projects they have been developing to give back to their home countries.
  12:30-1:45 p.m., Multipurpose Room
    Contact: LaRhonda Wilson, 314-513-4390 and Susan McKnight, 314-513-4237


Celebration Circle
The WHM committee invites all the women on campus to come together in a circle of celebration that focuses on mind and body wellness. Come out and celebrate the women on our campus as we “weave the stories of our lives.”
2-2:30 p.m., Quad (weather permitting) or IR lobby
Contact: LaRhonda Wilson, 314-513-4390

   Wednesday, March 4
    Weaving the Stories of Our Lives
WHM Keynote Address with Cecilia Nadel
   

Cecilia Nadal is the founder and Executive Director of Gitana Productions Inc., an arts and education organization that uses music, dance, drama and education as vehicles for bringing diverse groups together in acceptance and mutual understanding. Global Education through the Arts, a community arts program, serves African American and immigrant/refugee youth that live in shared neighborhoods helping them to understand each other and work in effective teams through arts and leadership training.
Nadal currently is producing “Black and Blue,” a play that explores the complex relationship between the African American community and police. Inspired by recent events in Ferguson and written by Lee Patton Chiles, the play will debut Spring 2015.
Nadal has been recognized for her work locally and nationally by a number of organizations. Most recently she was one of 38 selected from 800 candidates for the “Purpose Prize Award” sponsored by Encore.Org., an organization that recognizes the social innovation of people 60 and over. She is a graduate of Leadership St. Louis and was recognized with the prestigious Women of Achievement award for cultural enrichment in St. Louis. Cecilia was selected by St. Louis Magazine as a “St. Louis Luminary” and was the recipient of the YWCA Leadership Award for her work as founder and CEO of Productive Futures, Inc.

  9:30-11 a.m., Terry M. Fischer Theatre
    Sponsor: WHM committee


Q & A with Cecilia Nadel
CTL Faculty Lunch and Workshop with Keynote 
Noon-1:30 p.m., Emerson Lobby

   Thursday, March 5
    Objects and Realities: The work of Alison Ouellette-Kirby and Snail Scott
Gallery Reception
    6-8 p.m., Contemporary Art Gallery, IR-111
   

Contact: Janice Nesser, 314-513-4861

  Monday, March 9
    Tell Me a Story: Letters to Lina 
    Theatre Performance
This is a Chamber Theatre performance focusing on the life and work of Friedl Dicker-Brandeis, an art teacher who taught the children of Terezin, a concentration camp outside of Prague. 
  Two performances: 11 a.m.-12:15 p.m., 2-3:15 p.m., Terry M. Fischer Theatre
    Contact: Carol Hake, chake@stlcc.edu and Sarah Fielding, sfielding@stlcc.edu
   
   Tuesday, March 10
    The Great Balancing Act
Shower and Round Table Discussion
Emerson Lobby
This panel focuses on the challenges female students face balancing school, work and
motherhood. Donations of items will be accepted for the Pregnancy Resource Center. Cake and punch will
be served.
4:30-6 p.m., Emerson Lobby
Contact: Julie Fickas, jfickas@stlcc.edu, Sarah Fielding, sfielding@stlcc.edu, Carla Jordan, cjordan55@stlcc.edu
  Wednesday, March 11
    Women’s Stories of Hope
A presentation of stories from women who have either been to prison, had a loved one in prison or who have cared for children of prisoners or adult children who grew up with a parent in prison.
Presentation
    9:40–10:45 a.m., IR-112
  Contact: LaRhonda Wilson, 314-513-4390
   Tuesday, March 24
    Triple Threat: Women’s Acts of Resistance in African American Literature
This is a discussion of literary figures and their real-life counterparts as they are represented in African American literature.
    Lecture/discussion
    11 a.m.-Noon, IR-112
    Contact: Lonetta Oliver, 314-513-4132
   Wednesday, March 25
    Gee’s Bend Quilts, History, Pattern and Design
    Gee’s Bend is an African American community of quilters that was part of the mid-­‐60’s Freedom Quilting Bee, an offshoot of the Civil Rights Movement. In 2002 the quilts were shown at the Museum of Fine Arts, Houston and later at the Whitney Museum in New York City, hailed as “miraculous works of American Art.” The quilts are featured in several books and a series of 2006 First Class U.S. Postage Stamps. The New York Times referred to the quilts “color and rhythm akin to abstract painting.”
    Lecture 
    9– 11 a.m., H-106
    Contact: Margaret Coates, mcoates8@stlcc.edu 314-513-4376
   
    Their Stories: Women and Violence in Africa
    Film and discussion
Viewing of the movie “Yesterday” followed by a group discussion.
    1-2 p.m., IR-112

Contact: Barbara Hufker, 314-513-4711

   Thursday, March 26
    Basic Self-Defense For Women
Facilitated by Officer Ray Baker, Florissant Valley Campus Police
    11 a.m.-Noon, Multipurpose Room
    Contact: Myrtle Alexander, x4270
  Friday, March 27
    Women & Justice: A Film Discussion
This event will look at one woman’s story within the criminal justice system and will ask us all to reflect on how we support a more just society.
    Film and discussion
    10:30 a.m.–Noon, SS-101
    Contact: Annie Wagganer 314-513-4337
  Monday, March 30
    Women Illustrators of the Golden Age
Lecture on the important role women illustrators had in shaping illustration and design.
   

1 - 2:15 p.m., Lecture H 102
Contact: Julia Jenner, jjenner@stlcc.edu 314-513-4865
   Tuesday, March 31
   

WHM: CLOSING EVENT
Lunch and Learn
“Weaving the Stories of our Community: A Century of Black Life, History and Culture “
with Reverend Traci Blackmon
11 a.m. - 12:15 p.m, Terry M. Fischer Theatre
Contact: Myrtle Alexander, malexander@stlcc.edu 314-513-4270

ONGOING FOR THE MONTH OF MARCH
Weaving the Story of Women’s Lives
Display in Student Center, Career and Employment Services
Contact: Michela Walsh, mwalsh@stlcc.edu 314-513-4543

OBJECTS AND REALITIES: The Sculptures of Alison Ouellette-Kirby and Snail Scott
Exhibition
Contemporary Art Gallery, IR 111 Gallery hours: M-F: Noon-4 p.m., Saturday: 10 a.m.-2 p.m.
Contact: Janice Nesser-Chu, jnesser@stlcc.edu 314-513-4861

Spotlight on New Faculty: The Work of Erica Popp and Erika Swinson
Exhibition – Annex A & B display cases, Arts & Humanities Building Hours: M-F: 9 a.m. - 7 p.m.
Contact: Janice Nesser-Chu, jnesser@stlcc.edu 314-513-4861

   

Forest Park

     March 3, 4, 5 & 30
      Weaving the Stories of Women’s Lives
    10 a.m.-6 p.m.
    Highlander Lounge
    This visual display commemorates numerous contributions made by women throughout history and includes quotes that are applicable today. Various activists, authors, athletes, educators, entertainers, executives, journalists and others are recognized. The display is just a sample of how women have enriched our society. We are encouraging you to research, discover and be inspired to create change in yourself, your family, your community and beyond.
   
   Wednesday, March 4
    Where Do We Go From Here? - Civil, Human and Women's Rights - Keynote address with Carmen Berkley
    11 a.m.
    Mildred E. Bastian Center for the Performing Arts
    Carmen Berkeley is currently the Civil, Human, and Women’s Rights Director at the AFL-CIO. But she is widely recognized for training consulting, and organizing youth and students, in a wide range of other activist groups. She has been a principal consultant at “Can’t Stop, Won’t Stop,” and a lead trainer for Campus Camp Wellstone. Previously, she served as President of the U.S. Student Association, as a regional field director for NAACP, a digital strategist for AFSCME and Field Director for CHOICE USA.
   
   Thursday, March 5
    From MC's and Queens to B*tchez and H*ez: The Evolution of Female Identity in Hip-Hop
  11 a.m.
    Café West
    This event will discuss the history of the female in hip-hop music through music and video. The presentation will describe the development of female identity within hip-hop music and illustrate the evolution of women within the culture from a status of equality to one that is focused on sexual objectification. It will also examine ideas of hip-hop feminism and the future of women in hip-hop. Presented by Dorian Brown, Associate Professor, History.
   
   Monday, March 9
    From MC's and Queens to B*tchez and H*ez: The Evolution of Female Identity in Hip-Hop
  12:30 p.m.
    William J. Harrison Education Center
   

This event will discuss the history of the female in hip-hop music through music and video. The presentation will describe the development of female identity within hip-hop music and illustrate the evolution of women within the culture from a status of equality to one that is focused on sexual objectification. It will also examine ideas of hip-hop feminism and the future of women in hip-hop. Presented by Dorian Brown, Associate Professor, History.

 Tuesday, March 10
    Day of Dialogue: Showering Conversations
    Noon-2 p.m.
    Café West
   

In collaboration with the St. Louis Community College Chapter of the American Association of Women in Community Colleges, this event will feature dialogue about the results of a survey of women on campus, both staff and students, on topics such as domestic violence, dating violence and body image. Attendees are asked to bring a baby item to be donated to the Maternity Care program for homeless pregnant and/or parenting teens at Good Shepherd Children and Family Services. Donations can also be made by contacting Nicole Myers AAWCC Chapter President at nmyers17@stlcc.edu.

 Wednesday, March 11
    Your Mama’s Math Gene: The Legacy and Future of Women in Mathematics
    11 a.m.
    Café West
    How does a mathematician’s mind work? Do most of us lack some necessary “math gene”? What role does society play in our attitudes about math and gender? Meet some of our most famous female mathematicians, past and present, and find out how YOU can affect the future! Presented by Deborah Char, Assistant Professor, Mathematics.
 Thursday, March 12
    Weaving the Stories of Women’s Lives
    10 a.m.-6 p.m.
    William J. Harrison Education Center
    This visual display commemorates numerous contributions made by women throughout history and includes quotes that are applicable today. Various activists, authors, athletes, educators, entertainers, executives, journalists and others are recognized. The display is just a sample of how women have enriched our society. We are encouraging you to research, discover and be inspired to create change in yourself, your family, your community and beyond.
    “Mad” Girls: Calling Women Crazy in Fiction and Pop Culture
    11 a.m.
    Café West
    The hysterical lady. The psycho ex-girlfriend. The raving madwoman. Calling a woman “crazy” is an easy way to discredit her voice or to explain away behavior that doesn’t fall in with expectations for femininity. Ignoring real mental health concerns, such labels are often used to marginalize and silence women. In this talk, I will discuss theories of women’s madness before turning to depictions of “crazy” women from fiction, film, television, and music. In doing so, I hope to show that these labels—throughout history and still prevalent today—are frequently not connected to a diagnosable mental disorder but are, instead, only in place as a means of patriarchal control. Presented by Emily Tuttle, Adjunct Instructor and doctoral candidate, Saint Louis University, English.
    Spoken Word performance by Idara AKA Ill Skillz
    6 p.m.
    William J. Harrison Education Center
    Come and be spellbound. Spend an evening with thought bending lyricist/poet/actress Ill Skillz. A St. Louis native with roots in Nigeria and France, she has graced many venues around the country. She released her debut CD The Locs in 2001 and has been featured in “Independent” and major motion pictures. She is currently working on her sophomore CD.
 Tuesday, March 24
    Fitness, Fatness, and Roller Derby: Gender and Body Image in Pop Culture
    11 a.m.
    Café West
    Whether it’s a Beyoncé video inspiring women to love their curves, a Weight Watchers ad imploring us to make ourselves smaller, or a Facebook picture designed to motivate our workouts, we are constantly bombarded with pop culture images of fitness and messages about acceptable body image. This presentation will explore the gendering of those messages in a variety of pop culture sources and the ways that they intersect and conflict in the quickly-growing sport of flat track roller derby.
Presented by Michelle Parrinello-Cason, Instructor II, English.
 Thursday, March 26
    Local Women Memoirists Author Panel
    11 a.m.
    Café West
    This panel will feature Kathleen Finneran, local author of “The Tender Land” and Writer in Residence at Washington University and Terry Baker Mulligan, author of “Sugar Hill, Where the Sun Rose Over Harlem,” and “Afterlife in Harlem.” We will hear excerpts from the authors’ works and hear a moderated discussion of their creative process and writing experiences.
    Women of Tears and Laughter: An Evening with Alberta Hunter and Jackie 'Moms' Mabley
    5:30 p.m.
    William J. Harrison Education Center
    "Tears and Laughter" provides history along with the humor. Fannie Lebby performs as both Hunter and Mabley, two black women who paved the way for others entering the entertainment industry in the United States. Presented by Fannie Lebby. Lebby grew up in the middle of the Civil Rights movement. She attended the University of Mississippi, but finished her degree at Texas Southern University. There, she graduated as the only black in the university's theater program. Lebby enjoys reaching out to younger generations who may not know anything about the two women, and teaching how their success made it possible for others.
 Tuesday, March 31
    Incarcerations in Black and White
    11 a.m.
    Café West
    Christi Griffin will be discussing her book “Incarcerations in Black and White.” Griffin is an alumna of Webster University and received her juris doctorate from Saint Louis University in 1983. She is the founder and president of The Ethics Project, which aims to reduce the impact of crime through education and engagement with professional ethics. This project has garnered multiple partnerships and collaborations, providing a consortium of programs working toward this goal.
 March (ongoing display)
    Quilt for Peace Project
    Cafeteria
    The Quilt for Peace will be displayed during the month of March in the Cafeteria to commemorate Women’s History Month.

During the recent incidents in Ferguson, Missouri, The Xi Epsilon chapter of Phi Theta Kappa at Forest Park joined forces with other student organizations, at our sister campuses, in sponsoring the Clothesline For Peace. Xi Epsilon worked collectively, at Forest Park, with the International Student Club, Student Government, Campus Life, the Counseling department and the Honors program to encourage our campus community to write or draw sentiments of peace, love, and hope, on T-shirts and blocks of fabric. The blocks of fabric were made into a quilt. This project serves as a conduit for faculty, students and community members to show support to the residents of Ferguson and, at the same time, redirect feelings in a positive way.
   

Meramec

   Monday, March 2
    Dr. Megan Ming Francis, Ph.D.
    Keynote Address: “Why We Can’t Wait: Women, Civil Rights, and Strategies for Today”
11-11:50 a.m., Theatre - Meramec
    Megan Ming Francis is the author of “Civil Rights and the Making of the Modern American State”
(Cambridge University Press, 2014). Her work sits at the intersection of race, law, history, capitalism, and
civil rights. Francis earned a Ph.D. from the Department of Politics at Princeton University and a B.A. in Political Science and Economics from Rice University. She is an Assistant Professor in the Department
of Political Science at the University of Washington.
   
    How do we fight against injustice today? Francis believes a reconsideration of civil rights history points the way forward. This talk explores the heroic role women played at key political and legal junctures in the civil
rights movement, highlighting the role of women in shaping the meaning of American democracy, equality and citizenship. The talk offers an examination of strategies that movement leaders utilized and 
reconsiders the utility of these strategies to address continuing rights struggles that we still face today.
   
  Monday, March 9
    Peace by Piece: Women, Needlework, and Nonviolent Protest
A lecture by Dr. Joyce Johnson & Quilt Dedication
    March 9, 11-11:50 a.m., SC 200/201 - Meramec
    In October 2014, students, faculty and staff of the Meramec campus wrote messages of hope and peace for the residents of Ferguson. The messages have evolved into a quilt that will be dedicated to the Meramec campus on March 9. Dr. Joyce Johnson will present a short lecture called “Peace by Piece: Women,
Needlework, and Nonviolent Protest” on the history of quilt making as a form of social protest.

Co-sponsored with: Native People’s Club, Department of Social and Behavioral Sciences, Public Speaking students, and Global Justice Project.

   
Tuesday, March 10
Film Screening: “Rape Myths on Trial”
12:30-1:45 p.m., SO 105
Darlaine Gardetto, SOC:101 Introduction to Sociology Anne Munch, a career prosecutor and advocate for victims of gender violence, examines how cultural attitudes shape the outcomes of rape and sexual assault
cases. Drawing on years of experience prosecuting sex crimes, Munch shows how rape cases often turn on the involvement of an “unnamed conspirator”—the complex of myths and stories we tell ourselves as a culture about sex, gender, power and responsibility. Using examples from real cases and harrowing evidence from actual 911 calls, Munch reveals how the assumptions that juries bring into the courtroom often stack the odds against victims, and at the same time challenges us to think critically about how our own assumptions might unintentionally reinforce victim-blaming. The result is a stunning look inside our criminal justice system and an incisive analysis of American culture’s warped views of women’s sexuality.
 
  Wednesday, March 11 and 25
    A Feminist Café
    March 11 and 25, 1-2:15 p.m., SO 107 - Meramec
    The WHM Committee and student facilitators Suzan Dague, Rebecca Shuler and Elena Greene invite the Meramec community to join us in a Feminist Café to address exciting questions while enjoying some good
company. All are welcome to attend – whether you have never heard of feminism, have questions about what feminism is or have come up with your own definition of feminism. We hope you’ll join us!
Co-sponsored with the Sociology Club.
   
  Monday-Thursday, March 23-26
    Women's Clothesline Project
    11 a.m.-2 p.m., Library Quad (rain location Student Center Lobby) - Meramec
    The Clothesline Project (CLP) is a national project, which serves as a visual depiction of violence against women and bears witness to this serious problem within our communities. The CLP was started in Cape Cod, MA in 1990 and serves as a vehicle for women affected by violence to express their emotions by decorating a shirt. The shirts are then hung on a clothesline to be viewed by others as testimony to the problem of violence against women.
    Co-sponsored with the Diversity Committee.

WILDWOOD

The Women of Bellefontaine Cemetery
Tuesday, March 10
12:20 p.m.
Multipurpose Room

Established in 1849, Bellefontaine Cemetery played an important role in the early growth of St, Louis and is the final resting place of many historical figures such as poet Sara Teasdale and suffragette Virginia L. Minor. Join Dan Fuller, Volunteer Coordinator and Master Guide of Bellefontaine Ceremony, as he shares some of the life stories of the women who are laid to rest in the cemetery.