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STLCC-Forest Park Physics Instructor Selected for Honor

September 10, 2010

Jonathan Morris  
Jonathan Morris, assistant professor in physics at Forest Park,
presented his research findings at one of the prestigious
Gordon Research Conferences in August.

Nuclear physicist Jonathan Morris, assistant professor in physics at St. Louis Community College-Forest Park, was honored to speak at one of the prestigious Gordon Research Conferences in August. 

The Gordon Conferences are international forums where scientists present and discuss frontier research in biology, chemistry, physical sciences and their related technologies.

The conference in Tilton, N.H., was on “Photonuclear Reactions,” and Morris presented a paper on the "Influence of Short-Range Spatial and Long-Range Dynamic Correlations on One-and Two-Body Properties in Matter.” This research on nuclei explained the way neutrons and protons stick together 20 percent of the time while 80 percent of the time they behave like single particles, he said.

Morris, who had never presented at a Gordon Conference before, is currently working on his doctorate at Washington University, and hopes to finish his dissertation by January. This research is part of his findings while working on his advanced degree, collaborating along with his advisor.

The Gordon Conferences bring together young scientists to discuss current research and build informal networks with their peers for a lifetime of collaboration and scientific achievement.

“It’s all unpublished research, cutting-edge stuff,” Morris said. “It was a fantastic  experience.”

Morris is in his seventh year of teaching at Forest Park, and is the primary physics instructor. He earned a bachelor’s degree at Truman State University and a master’s degree at Washington University. A native St. Louisan, Morris and his wife Anis have four children ranging in age from 4 to 13.

“This is an extraordinary accomplishment within the scientific community and brings international recognition to our science department,” said Patricia McEwen, dean of health and natural science.

Morris hopes to have their findings published in a scientific journal, such as the prominent Physical Review C.